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The Alameda, The Beautiful Way (excerpt)

The Alameda, The Beautiful Way (excerpt)

Shasta/Hanchett Park

The Agricultural Park encompassed 76 acres of land bordered by Race Street, The Alameda, Magnolia Avenue and Park Avenue. The Santa Clara Valley Agricultural Society began to have state fairs in 1856, but finally bought this park in 1859. The Agricultural Society’s fundraising committee sold subscriptions and raised $14,464.55 in just two weeks. The Society paid General Naglee $6,000 for the 76-acre parcel. This allowed the society to use the remaining funds to improve the park. This park served as a recreational facility for over 40 years. Livestock fairs, circuses, and dances made this one of the most popular San Jose parks. Leland Stanford raced his prize horses, Palo Alto and Occident, in the famous racing track located there. After returning from his trip around the world in 1879, President Grant visited The Agricultural Park to watch Occident race against the clock. In 1905, the “father of basic flying” and inventor of the cambered wing, John J. Montgomery, gave some of the first public flight demonstrations of a heavier than air high-air glider in the Agricultural Park.
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Alameda Park Subdivision, Part 1 of 3

Alameda Park Subdivision, Part 1 of 3

The Alameda Park subdivision includes 99 parcels on four streets—Schiele, Pershing, Harding and Hoover Avenues. (See Figure-1.) It was built out during the boom years of the 1920’s with modest, predominantly single-story family home, with two or three bedrooms and a single bath. The architecture is quintessential California, the type featured in Sunset magazine during this time and best classified as 20th century revival. The area has maintained a high level of architectural integrity through the years.

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Alameda Park Subdivision, Part 2 of 3

Alameda Park Subdivision, Part 2 of 3

The Architecture

Styles

81 of the 95 homes built during the 1920s remain and continue to reflect their original 20th century revival architecture.  They fall into six styles:  Spanish Eclectic (33 homes), Tudor (24 homes), Craftsman (13 homes), Italian Renaissance (6 homes), Mission (4 homes) and Prairie (1 home).  Additionally, there are four homes with no single dominant style.  Even those homes classified into a style frequently have some influence of another.

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Alameda Park Subdivision, Part 3 of 3

Alameda Park Subdivision, Part 3 of 3

Windows and Doors

Windows and doors are a key feature of every home in the Alameda Park. All have (or had) true divided lights in a variety of pane patterns. Square or rectangular window panes are either presented in a frame pattern or are evenly divided into panes of the same size. Semi-circle window panes are presented in fan, sunburst or evenly divided patterns. The variations identified on homes in the subdivision are:

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SHPNA Map 1876 - Today

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Last Updated ( Monday, 10 October 2011 09:01 )

San Jose in Early 1950s

This film was produced for the San Jose Chamber of Commerce in the early 1950s as a promotional tool. San Jose was the focal point of the Santa Clara Valley.

Last Updated ( Sunday, 09 October 2011 13:07 )

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